Perceptions of mental illness: The media and mental health.

Written by Rae  Edited by Jonathan You wouldn’t blame someone with breast cancer or cystic fibrosis for their disease, would you? We know they are caused by impaired biological mechanisms. Lifestyle choices can exacerbate risk but there is less stigma associated with suffering from a ‘physical’ rather than mental illness.  With both types of illness stigma stems…

Things that look like your brain but actually aren’t

When you’re drunk and merry celebrating Christmas today, remember to watch out for the brain imposters! The Brain Domain team have put together a list of some of the most convincing brain imposters – things that look like your brain but actually aren’t!                        …

Sport on the brain; when do the risks outweigh the benefits?

Written by Catherine Foster Edited by Jonathan and Rachael  You’re likely to have come across articles citing evidence that physical fitness and sport participation benefits cardiovascular and brain health1. Active lifestyles reduce the risk of high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and stroke. Physical activity has also been shown to reduce inflammation, depression, cerebral…

Who the hell is MEG, and how can she help us understand the brain?

Let me tell you about a MEG who doesn’t get her fair share of the limelight. MEG uses her SQUIDs to catch your brain activity, after it has left your head. She’s quite a fast mover, and can do this at a millisecond rate! Strangely though, she’s kept locked in a room with really thick walls….

Happy Halloween!

I know you were wondering this today, and yes, there is a subset of genes named “Halloween genes”. In line with a long standing tradition of naming biological units after silly things, the halloween gene family includes spook, spookier, phantom (phm), disembodied (dib), shadow (sad), and shade. These genes were first identified in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit…

Lecture Summary: Dopamine Neuron Regulation & Its Implications for Schizophrenia

Speaker: Professor Anthony Grace, University of Pittsburg Date/Time: 13 October 2016, 4-6pm Venue: Lecture Theatre, Hadyn Ellis Building, Cardiff University Lecture Summary: Dopamine Neuron Regulation & its Implications for the Treatment and Prevention of Schizophrenia      Most drug treatments for schizophrenia target the dopaminergic system, but many gene variants linked to schizophrenia (and subsequently targeted for research) are relevant…

Mini-Update of Neuroscience News

Our regular postings have been interrupted by the holiday period and several conferences, so until we have things back to normal we have a small update of neuroscience news! Firstly, The Brain Domain will be presenting at the Neuropalooza conference later this month. Good luck to all the other presenters! Remember to check out our…

Dogs and Coffee Shops on the Brain

Dogs understand human, but do you understand Dog? If you’ve ever heard the claim that dogs don’t understand what you’re saying to them, only how you say it, then it’s time to check your facts! An MRI study in Hungary has established dogs not only process intonation, but also words. Dogs need both words and…

What is neuroimmunology and why should I care?

By Dr Niels Haan Everybody knows about the immune system, right? You get an infection and your body mobilises its army of immune cells and fights off the invaders. You get a fever, feel awful for a while, then things get back to normal. However, in the brain, it doesn’t work that way. In immunology,…

Your cat is trying to control your mind! (Inadvertently).

Cats or dogs? An eternal debate, with passionate advocates on both sides. Those in the pro dog camp have an unusual argument they could lobby: cats can infect you with mind controlling parasites. Toxoplasma gondii is a single celled obligate parasite, which means it is unable to complete its life cycle without a suitable host….