Learning to make healthier food choices

By Sophie Waldron  Edited By Jonathan If you haven’t already, read Sophie’s first article ‘Learn, eat, repeat: how food advertising works’! You are sitting down at a desk and a huge burger comes floating towards you. It gets bigger and bigger as it advances, faster and faster. Luckily, you know what you have to do. Don’t press anything…

Learn, eat, repeat: how food advertising works

By Sophie Waldron  Edited By Jonathan You woke up late and ate breakfast late. Thing is, now it’s noon and you are hungry again. How can you be hungry when you only ate an hour ago? When interacting with our environment, we form associations between items that occur together. This occurs with food, for example…

How to read a baby’s mind

By Priya Silverstein  Edited by Jonathan and Rachael Priya, a guest writer for The Brain Domain, is a second-year PhD student at Lancaster University. She spends half her time playing with babies and the other half banging her head against her computer screen. Okay, I’ll admit that was a bit of a clickbait-y title. But…

The Neuroscience of Mindfulness: What Happens When We Meditate?

By Joseph Holloway Edited by Jonathan and Rachael Joe is a guest writer for The Brain Domain, and is currently pursuing an MSc in Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapies and Approaches, as well as an MA in 18th Century Literary Studies, at the University of Exeter. ‘Mindfulness’ is a word that has gathered momentum over the last…

Whatever you end up doing this Valentine’s day, we hope you enjoy this cathartic moan about your very closest companion, your brain. This poem is inspired by one from this film, but I didn’t have to tell you that, did I?  Please follow the links (underlined text) in the poem to learn more about the…

Things that look like your brain but actually aren’t

When you’re drunk and merry celebrating Christmas today, remember to watch out for the brain imposters! The Brain Domain team have put together a list of some of the most convincing brain imposters – things that look like your brain but actually aren’t!                        …

Sport on the brain; when do the risks outweigh the benefits?

Written by Catherine Foster Edited by Jonathan and Rachael  You’re likely to have come across articles citing evidence that physical fitness and sport participation benefits cardiovascular and brain health1. Active lifestyles reduce the risk of high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and stroke. Physical activity has also been shown to reduce inflammation, depression, cerebral…

Who the hell is MEG, and how can she help us understand the brain?

Let me tell you about a MEG who doesn’t get her fair share of the limelight. MEG uses her SQUIDs to catch your brain activity, after it has left your head. She’s quite a fast mover, and can do this at a millisecond rate! Strangely though, she’s kept locked in a room with really thick walls….

What is neuroimmunology and why should I care?

By Dr Niels Haan Everybody knows about the immune system, right? You get an infection and your body mobilises its army of immune cells and fights off the invaders. You get a fever, feel awful for a while, then things get back to normal. However, in the brain, it doesn’t work that way. In immunology,…

Reflections on Dementia

This is not our usual type of Brain Domain article, but personal stories are important reminders of why neuroscience research is so crucial. Here are some touching thoughts from a friend of someone with Dementia.   Dementia: Please no! By Andy Stickland Edited by Rachael As I look upon my frail friend Bob, lying there in…

There is more than one scientist

Article edited by Jonathan Fagg  The word ‘scientist’.. Why do we use this umbrella term? What do the words scientist, physicist, consilience, catastrophism, uniformitarian, ion, anode and cathode all have in common? Well, the late William Whewell, a wordsmith and polymath, created them, often suggesting them to scientists when they had made a discovery. As well as the many scientific…

Content coming soon..

The brain is a wonderful organ. It starts working the moment you get up in the morning and does not stop until you get into the office. Robert Frost The team at The Brain Domain are working hard to make this site a useful resource for people interested in neuroscience, at all different levels. We are…